November Updates

I have been collaborating with poet and friend Sanjana Rajagopal on musically illustrating her fantastic, otherworldly poem series ‘Dream Palace.’ The first four demos of these pieces can be found here with links to the original poems.

I recently wrote on my NASA Academy and honors thesis project for Madame Mars, a transmedia production documenting the role of women in space science, which interviewed me in 2014 (and quoted my interview on HuffPost). You can read the article here, and subscribe to their fantastic media here.

My uncle Rajiv Mohabir, a talented poet and teacher, writes on the liminality of Indo-Caribbean experiences and discusses several authors and poets, including myself, and how we relate to this heritage via our work in this blog post for the North American Review.

I’m working on a series of poetry zines with several artists. The first topic of this series is ‘the void’; read my take here.

Finally, all of my books are on sale for the holidays! Check out details here.

‘User-friendly Urbanism’ – out now!

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I’m stoked for the release of User-Friendly Urbanism: Against Preservation for its Own Sake, a series of essays curated by the always-incredible Sonya Mann! My essay ‘Intermission’ discusses a few of my experiences in cities and the idea of modern-day occupation in America. Get your copy here and check out the description:

Cities are struggling to satisfy their residents. The officials, elected or not, scramble to make good on their promises. Rents keep rising while incomes stagnate. At times the metropolis plays host to socioeconomic conflicts that feel apocalyptic.

In this atmosphere, urbanists should borrow a term from tech, and consider how to create a user-friendly city. Such a city is not only walkable and smogless. Macro conditions matter as well. User-friendly cities are shaped by policies that nurture the residents and local businesses. Broadly, user-friendly urbanism prioritizes human beings rather than the dead matter of the built environment they occupy.

Featuring essays by Nicole Dieker, Loretta Carr, and Divya Persaud, and interviews with Martin Weigert and Aaron Renn.

[photo by Sonya]